Home | Tell a Friend | Donations | Resources | Discussion | Blog

Antenna Booster Complaints
Total Complaints: 11
Report This Product
Read Defenses

 

12/4/2006 - Mike writes:
This Product is a little sticker with gold lines on it like someone else said. This thing doesn't work. I was given one as a gag gift and decided since I had it why not try it out. Well I wasn't surprised when it didn't work. This is a pure scam through and though.

7/15/2006 - Raymond writes:
The internal antennae booster is completely useless....it's merely a gold colored sticker that does absolutely zilch in boosting my cell signal. Whoever dreamed up of this scam is absolutely brilliant and deserves the money he cheated me out of. I was too naive and should have known better

1/27/2006 - Brad writes:
When I first saw the 'Antenna Booster' on late night TV, my first thought was 'Yah, right...friggin stupid'. How could this work? It's a small piece of metallic plastic I place in the BACK of my cell phone. It has no contact with the regular antenna. Sure, through the wonder of Near-Field Radiance the signal might show a small improvement  (the same way that setting an AM radio near a large metal object or setting a portable CB antenna on a car roof or tin shed will improve the reception), but how could it make any serious improvement to cell reception? Well, I had never seriously considered buying one, until one day when I went to the [] and saw the antennas boosters being sold at 5 for a dollar. What they heck I thought, so I bought 5. I had read reports and heard stories that they actually screw up cell phones, so I applied one to an older cell phone that I had already planned to replace at the beginning of the year. I saw no improvement in signal reception. In fact, my phone started to drop calls for no apparent reason. Other times, I would completely miss calls, my phone wouldnt even ring (I knew this when I started getting voicemails from people wondering why I wasnt answering my phone). Then, my cell phone started flubbing up bad- it would turn itself off for no reason, and then turn on, then off- on, off, on, off until the battery was depleted. When I mentioned this to a salesman at the cell company, he immediately told me to remove the  antenna  booster before it caused permanent damage. He told me he had read reports from his company's R&D department showing that the boosters actually did the opposite, and in many cases self-destructed the phones. I was concerned about this, so I spoke with a friend of mine who works in the tech. department at the local phone company (they also provide LD, cell service, dial up, and DSL). He said that his department had reviewed the antenna boosters, and discovered them to contain small amounts of highly magnetized metal that is infused into the plastic. He said they appear designed to do one thing- destroy any phone they are placed on. My friend even went so far so as to say his company believes the antenna boosters are a purposeful scam, designed and perpetrated by one or more cell phone manufacturers to boost sales of new cell phones (the boosters are often not covered under warranties by cell companies, and if the booster contributes to a phones malfunction, the owner of the phone has to pay to replace it). I not only had to replace the cell phone I put the booster on, I also had to replace the battery. The constant turning on/off depleted the battery so badly that it no longer would hold a charge. I advise anyone who reads this to refrain from using a cell phone antenna booster, unless they like having their cell phone go haywire and they enjoy having to pay big bucks for a new phone.

10/28/2005 - James writes:
How about some foriegners taking advantage of novice cell phone users who just need better cell coverage?  Well, They got over on me.  I just paid 170 for this new motorola off the internet, It's got bells and whistles that I never got a chance to find out how to turn them on.  I've heard about these antenna boosters and bam, a hundred web pages were selling these stupid looking things that every website made claims of improving signal.  Well, they got ten bucks out of me and when I got the email saying they were being shipped from some overseas factory, I was crushed cause I had gotten taken for my ten dollars and that some little kid probably had to paint my little sticker.  Well, I decided to go ahead and try it, wrong decision.  Let's just say my bells and whistles are gone and now I'm stuck with an insurance claim to get a new phone.  Could that be labeled as False Advertising?  I think there should be some type of reimbursement program but yeah, nobody's home, how great!

Dimitrios writes:
I'm sure I'm not the first one to be taken by the antenna booster claim.  It is a little sticker that attaches behind the battery on a cellphone.  Garbage!  What they did was advertise this antenna booster that "if you order now" you they'll include a hands-free kit for your cellphone.  When you get the products in the mail.   The box and paperwork actually shows that what you got is a hands-free kit with the worthless antenna booster sticker free.  The hands-free kit itself is a joke. It has a earpiece that is meant to plug into the phone, however modern day cellphones only allow you to plug up a hands-free earpiece and microphone combination.  Get it?  The hands-free kit that was sent to me is not relevant to modern cellphones. 

Alex writes:
This product is a total fraud it was tested on a show on street sense with a scientist.  It did not boost anything.  For a signal to be boosted it has to have some kinda metal aloy.  Thats why antennas are metal and expand up.  This product has no metal on it.  The phone companies could actually make your phone signal better but to do that the phone would send out a lot more radiation with a stronger signal.  but  the government has a cap on how much radiation a phone can put out so your phones signal is pretty much the best your gonna get.   Nothing you can do.  Also this product has no company contacts, (phones,email or address).  Their a ghost company.  And finally the scientist said that he's 99.9% sure that the antenna is just a sticker.  Don't be a sucker like me i bought 2 before seeing this.  So if you want to buy i a sticker I'm sure you can get a lot more for your 20 bucks and a lot more prettier ones!!!

Jeremy writes:
I almost bought this scam but went on Ebay and saw that this "sticker" was selling for no more than $1 and knew that it must be a scam. Then I got to thinking, the way any signal works is that the antenna must be cut to a certian length such as 1/4 of the wave length of the carrier signal and it must be touching the antenna for it to pick up another 1/4 or fraction of the wave. This is electronically impossible with the product advertised. The company is scamming millions of people out of their hard earned money, don't be one of them.

Brian writes:
I could not believe it when my mom hands me an internal entena and tells me that she got it in the mail by mistake, but that her signal is okay on her phone so she does not want to use it.  I actually got mine for free!!!   My excitement ended quickly when not only could I not longer get a signal upon application, I was also unable to even use my phone for games etc.  I was furious and could not figure out what the problem was until I phoned my cell provider and the first question out of her mouth was "did you get one of those antena boosters?"   I found out that not only do they not work, it can block the internal computer components from working all together.  She instructed me on how to remove it without ruining anything inside the phone itself.  Those suckers stick tight!!!  I have not had any problems since, but would like to warn all that want this product.  Save your money and buy a new face plate.

Maggie writes:
When we got our cell phone the salesperson said to never use one of these in your cell -- not only will they drain your cell's battery life it will also screw up the innerworkings of the cell!!

Timothy writes:
I recently bought the antenna booster and avoided the scams from T.V. But instead got mine from Ebay. I put it on the back of my phone and was excited about the 4 foot antenna I was about to receive. Well it was DEAD WRONG! I had the same amount of reception, and one thing that I noticed after I put it on was that I started getting delays when I talk to people. We would start walking all over each others conversation because the service was getting slower. I don't reccomend this "sticker" at all. I am very sorry for those of you that bought it for the full price. WARNING: do not spend your cash for these stupid "stickers"! Thanks,

Bob writes:
We got one of those Antenna boosters free when we ordered a cell phone battery. We thought it might work so we put it on our Verizon Wireless phone it did nothing. Then i thought how could it work, it is a plastic sticker with some Acrilic Paint shaped into so funy design. These were advertised to work with all phones but that is not true because the big metal antenna are specialized for the Frequency that the Cellular provider uses, and they also use different cellular technologies. T-mobile and Cingular use GSM (GLOBAL SYSTEM FOR MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS), Verizon wireless, Sprint, Alltel, And cellular south use CDMA (CODE DIVISION MULTIPLE ACCESS), Nextel and Southern linc use IDEN(Integrated Digital Enhannced Network) and AT&T/Cingular also use TDMA (TIME DIVISION MULTIPLE ACCESS), So there is no way that all these technologies will work with one little Universal sticker.

Sponsored Listings

 
Attorney Help
Have you been scammed? Do you live in Arizona?
scammedinarizona.com
 
Find Love Online
Find a serious relationship at PerfectMatch.com!
perfectmatch.com
 
Nanny Camera
Small discrete camera records everything!
x10.com
 
1-800-Infomercials
Huge online selection of TV products. No autoship!
1-800-infomercials.com
 

Infomercial Ratings

Wanted: Consumer infomercial reviews!
infomercialratings.com
 
Enzyte - As Seen On TV
All natural male enhancement. Learn more.
enzyte.com
 
Supplement Reviews
Consumer dietary supplement reviews!
supplementcritic.com
 
Your ad here

 

 

 

Donations | Advertise | Press Room | Contact

Copyright © 2007 Infomercial Scams. All rights reserved.

1802 N. Carson St. Suite 212-2151 Carson City, Nevada 89701